(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Colt M1911 & M1911A1 Pistol"

1 



f 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



para, page 



» 



i 



CHAPTER 1. DESCRIPTION, AUTOMATIC PISTOL CAL. 

.45, M1911 AND M1911A1 1-2 3 

CHAPTER 2. MECHANICAL TRAINING, PISTOL 

Section I. Disassembly and Assembly 3-8 9 

IL Functioning 9 1(3 

HI. Loading, Firing, and Unloading , . 10-13 21 

IV. Malfunctions, Stoppages, and Immediate 

Action ...... . 14-24 22 

V, Accessories . . . , 30 

VL Ammunition 25-30 30 

CHAPTER 3. MANUAL OF ARMS FOR THE PISTOL 31-33 34 

CHAPTER 4, MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING, PISTOL 

Section L General 34-36 36 

n. Preparatory Marksmanship Training . . . 37-41 36 

Supplement "A", Suggested Firing Courses 40 

CHAPTER 5. INSPECTION, DETAIL DISASSEMBLY, 

REPAIR AND REPLACEMENT, PISTOLS 

Section I. Inspection Prior to Disassembly 42-45 49 

n. Detail Disassembly 46-47 58 

HI. Inspection After Complete Disassembly, . 46 70 

IV. Repair and Replacement . 49-51 75 

V. Reassembly 52-54 76 

VI. Effects and Probable Causes of Accidents 

and Malfunctions 55 81 

Supplement "B" Tools, Gauges and Fixtures 

(PistolsM1911 andM19UAl) 56-57 86 



1 



PART ONE — AUTOMATIC PISTOLS 
CHAPTER ONE — DESCRIPTION 

SECTION 1 
GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS- 
AUTOMATIC PISTOL CAL 45, Ml 911 AND M1911A1 



1, DESCRIPTION. 

a. The Automatic Pistols, Cal. .45, M1911 and M1911A1, are recoil- 
operated, magazine-fed, self-loading hand weapons (figs. 1, 2, and 3). 
The gas generated from a cartridge fired in either pistol is utilized to 
extract and eject the empty cartridge case, cock the hammer, and force 
the slide to the rearmost position, thereby compressing the recoil spring. 
The action of the recoil spring forces the slide forward. This feeds a 
live cartridge from the magazine into the chamber leaving the weapon 
ready to fire again. 

b. The M1911A1 Pistol is a modification of the M191L Pistol, (figs. 
2 and 4) but its operation is exactly the same and the differences do not 
affect the maintenance. In the model M1911A1 the differences are: 

(1) The tang of the grip safety is extended to provide better pro- 
tection for the hand. 

{2) A clearance cut is made on the receiver for the trigger finger. 

(3) The face of the trigger is cut back and knurled. 

(4) The mainspring housing is raised in the form of a curve to fit 
the palm of the hand and is knurled, 

(5) The top of the front sight is widened, rear notch widened • 

c. The pistol is designed to fire CARTRIDGE, ball, Cal. .45, M191L 
The magazine holds seven cartridges. The upper cartridge is stripped 
from the magazine and forced into the chamber by the forward motion 
of the slide. The pistol fires once at each squeeze of the trigger. When 
the last cartridge in the magazine has been fired, the slide remains open. 
The magazine catch is then depressed and the magazine is forced out 
by the magazine spring. The rate of fire is limited only by the ability 
of the operator to insert magazines and to squeeze the trigger. 

2. GENERAL DATA. 

a - Characteristics. 

Barrel. 

Caliber of bore 0-45 in. 

Number of grooves 6 in. 

Twist in rifling, uniform L. PL, (one turn) .16 in. 

Length of barrel 5.03 in. 

3 




v> 



I 








CJ 



u 

Jo, 

O"- ^ 



5 
£ 



4) 




0" 



*» 



i 



** 




* 

u 

B 

ai 

3 

•* 



J* 

o c 



2 
5i 



i 



£• 

£ 




M-1911A1 



WIDE FRONT SIGHT 




M-191I 



NARROW FRONT SIGHT 



Figure 5 



Top of Pistols MT9JM1 and Ml 911 Showing 

Difference in Width of Sights 



Pistol. 

Overall length of pistol 8.593 in. 

Height of front sight above axis of bore 0,5597 in. 

Weights. 

Weight of pistol with magazine 2.437 lb 

Weight of loaded magazine, with 7 rounds approximate. 0-481 lb 

Weight of empty magazine 0.156 lb 

Trigger pull. 

Pistols, new or repaired 5 Vz to 6 Vz lb 

Pistols, in hands of troops . .- 5 to 6V2 lb 

Miscellaneous, 

Chamber pressure (maximum) ._.. 17,000 pounds 

per square inch 

Mu2zle velocity (maximum) ___ 830 feet per second 

Maximum range 1500 meters 

Maximum effective range . 50 meters 

Sight radius 6 , 481 inches 



8 



CHAPTER 2 
MECHANICAL TRAINING 



Section I. DISASSEMBLY AND ASSEMBLY 

3. General 

To insure that the pistol will function correctly, it is necessary 
to disassemble it to inspect and clean the parts. This chapter 
explains general disassembly, detailed disassembly of the three 
main groups, assembly^ functioning, care and cleaning, stoppages, 
and immediate action. It is a guide for mechanical training and 
outlines the procedures to be followed. 

4. Nomenclature 

The names of the parts of the pistol are learned during prac- 
tice in disassembly and assembly. As each part is removed and 
replaced, the nomenclature is repeated until known. Generally, 
the parts are named for their functions. For example, the trigger 
guard guards the trigger, the extractor extracts the cartridge 
case from the chamber, and the ejector ejects the cartridge case 
from the pistol. 

5. Guides to Follow in Disassembly and Assembly 

These guides should be followed when the pistol is being dis- 
assembled and assembled. 

a. Follow the step-by-step explanation in disassembling the 
pistol. 

0. If it is necessary to apply force, do it carefully so that none 
of the parts become damaged. 

c. As the weapon is disassembled, lay out the parts in the 
order of their removal. Dissassembly mats (GTA 9-617) are 
excellent aids during this phase of training. This procedure helps 
in assembly of the weapon, which is done in the reverse order of 
disassembly. 

6. General Disassembly 

General disassembly is the disassembly necessary for normal 
care and cleaning. General disassembly consists of the removal 
of the parts shown in figure 10. 



MAGAZINE CATCH 



MAGAZINE 




SLIDE STOP 



SAFETY 
LOCK 



) 



+ 




Figure S. Press the magazine catch and remove the magazine. Pull the 
slide to the rear and inspect the chamber to see that the weapon is 
clear. Press down oil. the slide stop and allow slide to move forward. 
Press the safety lock upward to the SAFE position. 



7. Procedure for General Disassembly 

Procedure for general disassembly is shown in fig-urea $ 
through 12 



°- Procedure for General Assembly 
Replace part -s in reverse order of disassembly. 



10 



AGO S«IB 



RECOIL SPRING PLUG 



BARREL BUSHING 





Figure 7. Press down on the recoil spring plug and turn the barrel bushing 
^4 turn clockwise. Allow the recoil spring to expand slowly, under 
control, to prevent injury or loss of the part. Turn the recoil spring 
plug counterclockwise and remove it from the recoil spring. 

<z. Barrel. Push the barrel link forward on the barrel and re- 
place the barrel, chamber end first, in the slide (%.«.)♦ 

b. Barrel Bushing. Place the barrel bushing on the muzzle 
end of the barrel, push, it into the slide, and turn it clockwise 
(fig.Ji-). 

c. Recoil Spring and Recoil Spring Guide. Insert the recoil, 
spring guide into the tightest end of the recoil spring. Replace 
these parts in the slide (fig./o.). Be sure that the concave cut on 
the recoil spring guide collar is properly seated on the barrel 
Push the barrel, recoil spring, and recoil spring guide fully 
forward in the slide, insuring that the barrel link is positioned 



n 



SLIDE STOP 



DISASSEMBLY NOTCH 



MWWfVVVVVW/ 




Figure S. Press the safety lock downward to the FIRE position. Push the 
slide to the rear until the disasseynbly notch is alined with the rear 
projection on the' slide stop. Press the protruding end of the slide stop 

pin with the right forefinger and pull out the slide stop. 




Figure 9 t Pull the receiver rearward to separate it from the slide, 



12 



RECOIL SPRING GUIDE 




- -r 






*** 






■-=5 



RECOIL SPRING 



Figure to. Remove the recoil spring guide and recoil spring. Separate the 

two parts with a tvristing action. 





BARREL BUSHING 






i _ 
Y 





Figure 11. Remove the barrel busking by filming it counterclockwise and 

pulling it from ike slide. 



13 



forward and rests against the hole in the recoil spring- guide 
(fig. 9). 

d. Assembling the Receiver Group to the Slide Group, Hold 
the slide with the sights down in the palm of one hand- Invert 
the receiver (the safety lock must be in the FIRE position) and 
engage the guide rails of the receiver in the grooves of the slide 
(fig. .9.). Push the receiver all the way forward on the slide with 
a quick motion, 

e. Slide Stop. Hold the pistol as shown in figure 8. Look 
through the slide stop pin hole in the receiver for alinement of 
this hole with the hole in the barrel link. If the holes are not 
alined, move the muzzle end of the barrel forward or rearward 
to aline them. Insert the slide stop pin into the holes. Move the 
slide forward untit the disassembly notch is over the square hole 
in the left side of the receiver (fig. s.) . Press the slide stop up 
and in to fully seat it. In some cases, a drift may be required to 
depress the slide stop plunger in order to fully seat the slide stop. 

/. Recoil Spring Plug. Push the slide fully forward on the re- 
ceiver and press the safety lock upward to the SAFE position. 
Place the recoil spring plug on the recoil spring. Turn the recoil 
spring plug clockwise to lock the plug to the recoil spring. Hold- 
ing the pistol as shown in figure 7, insert the recoil spring and 
push downward on the recoil spring plug, compressing the spring 
until the plug is inside the slide. Turn the barrel bushing counter- 
clockwise to lock the recoil spring plug in place. Press the safety 
lock downward to the FIRE position and squeeze the trigger. 

g. Magazine. Insert the magazine into the magazine recess of 
the pistol until it is fully seated and held by the magazine catch 
{fig. 6). This completes general assembly. 



BARREL LINK 



BARREL 




Figure jfjg. Push the barrel link forward and remove the barrel from the 
front end of the slide. This completes general disassembly. 



14 



o 



















O 










o 




cc 


a 








o 


CrT 


UT, HAMMER 


Z 

DC 

a. 
to 

Z 

< 

o 


Z 






O 





ac 

< 


LU 
< 


SAFETY, GRII 


r— 
Z> 

ac 


ac 


OC 


u 

z 
z 




< 

LU 
L/> 

6 

z 


ac 

D- 
</) 

z 
< 

5 


z 

QC 

a. 
to 

Z 


LU 

z 
< 


Z 

ID 




ac 

$ 

Z 
< 


Z 

a. 

O 



z 


Z 


Z 


5 


a 


DC 
XX. 


ac 

to 


z 

t/3 


oT 


< 


ac 


z 

LV 


z 

D- 




i 



o 

I 



15 



Section II 

FUNCTIONING 



9. FUNCTIONING. 

a. In loading, the charged magazine is inserted in the receiver (figJ-J.) 
and the slide is drawn once to the rear. This movement cocks the 
hammer and compresses the recoil spring (fig.15). The magazine follower 
then raises the upper cartridge into the path of the slide (fig, 16), When 
the slide is released, it is forced forward by the recoil spring and carries 
the first cartridge into the chamber of the barrel. As the slide approaches 
its forward position, it encounters the rear extension of the barrel and 
forces the barrel forward. The rear end of the barrel then swings upward 
on the barrel link as on a pivot. When the slide and barrel reach their 
forward position, they are positively locked together by the locking ribs 
on the barrel and slide. Their joint forward movement is arrested by 
the barrel lug encountering the pin on the slide stop. The pistol is then 
ready for firing (fig. 17). 

b. If it is desired to fire more than the magazine limit of seven 
cartridges at one loading, an additional cartridge is inserted by hand into 
the chamber of the barrel prior to inserting a loaded magazine. This is 



^ 




Figure ij . — Sectional View of Phtoi M1911A1, Slide Forward, 
Magazine Loaded, Chamber Empty, Hammer Down 



16 



--& 




Figure is.— -Sectional View of Pistol MT97MT, Slide Back, 

Hammer Back, Magazine Full f Enclosed! 




Figure /<;. - Sectionol View of Pistot MT9II4T. Slide Portly Forward, 

Cartridge Entering Chamber, Hammer Back 



accomplished by drawing back the slide, inserting the cartridge, allow- 
ing the slide to close, then locking the slide and the cocked hammer by 
pressing the safety lock upward. The slide and hammer are thus posi- 
tively locked and the pistol may be carried safely at full cock. It is only 
necessary to press down the safety lock to make the pistol ready to fire. 

17 




figure 



Sectional View of Pistol M1911A1, Slide Closed. 
Cartridge in Chamber, Hammer Back 



c* When the hammer is cocked, the hammer strut moves downward 
compressing the mainspring. The sear under the action of the long leaf 
of the sear spring engages its nose or tip in the notch on the hammer, 
holding it in the cocked position. 

d. In order that the pistol may be fired, the following conditions 
must exist: 

(1) The grip safety must be pressed in permitting the trigger to 
move. 

(2) The slide must be in its forward position, properly interlocked 
with the barrel, so that the disconnector is well in the recess on the 
underside of the slide, under action of the center leaf of the sear spring. 
In this position;, it transmits any motion of the trigger to the disconnector 
and sear. 

(3) The safety lock must be down, in the unlocked position, so that 
the sear will be unblocked and free to release the hammer. The slide 
will then be free to move back- 

e. Squeezing the trigger disengages the sear from the sear notch, 
releasing the hammer and letting it strike the firing pin. The blow 
overcomes the inertia of the pin and causes it to move forward. The 
forward end of the pin then strikes the primer of the cartridge, causing 

it to fire (fig. 18), 

NOTE: The primer of the cartridge is the cap inserted in the center 

18 




Figure is. 



Sectional View oi Pistol M1911A1, Hammer Down, 
firing Pin Striking Cartridge 



of the head of the cartridge case- It contains the detonating charge which 
is ignited by the impact of the firing pin. Detonation of this charge then 
ignites the propelling powder charge contained in the cartridge case. 

f- The pressure of the gases generated in the barrel by the explosion 
of the powder in the cartridge is exerted in a forward direction against 
the bullet, driving it through the bore. Pressure is also exerted in a rear- 
ward direction against the face of the slide, driving it and the barrel 
backward together- The slide travels the full distance while the barrel 
moves about V& inch. The downward swing movement of the barrel 
disengages it from the corresponding grooves in the slide. The barrel is 
then stopped in its lowest position- The slide continues to move to the 
rear, opening the breech, cocking the hammer, extracting and ejecting 
the empty shell, and compressing the recoil spring until the slide 
reaches its rearmost position (fig. J0), The return movement of the 
slide under the pressure of the recoil spring catches the cartridge, forc- 
ing it forward. The lips on the magazine, as well as the loading ramp 
on the rear end of the barrel, guide the cartridge into the chamber. 

g„ The weight, and consequently the inertia of the slide and the 
barrel, is so much greater than the weight and inertia of the bullet that 
the latter is driven from the muzzle before the slide and barrel have 
recoiled to the point where the barrel commences its unlocking move- 
ment- Thus, the opening of the breech of the barrel is delayed until 

IP 




Figure 19. — Sectional View of Pistol M1911A1, Slide Back, 
Cartridge Being Ejected, Hammer Back, Magazine Empty 

after the bullet has left the muzzle and the escape of any of the powder 
gases to the rear is practically prevented. This factor of safety is further 
increased by the tension of the recoil spring and mainspring, both of 
which oppose the rearward movement of the slide. 

h. The comparatively great weight of the slide of the pistol not only 
prevents premature opening of the breech, but also assures operation of 
the pistol. This is because the heavy slide attains a sufficient momentum 
to enable it to complete the rearward movement, allowing the cartridge 
to be forced into position by the magazine follower under pressure of 
the magazine spring. 

i. When the magazine has been emptied, the pawl-shaped slide stop 
is raised into the front recess on the lower left side of the slide by the 
magazine follower under the action of the magazine spring. This locks 
the slide in the opened position and serves as an indicator to remind 
the operator that the empty magazine must be replaced by a loaded one. 
Pressure upon the magazine catch quickly releases the empty magazine 
from the receiver, thus permitting the insertion of a loaded magazine. 

y To release the slide from the open position, it is only necessary 
to press upon the thumb piece of the slide stop- The slide will then go 
forward to its closed position carrying a cartridge from the magazine 
into the barrel and the pistol is ready to fire again. 



20 



Section JIJ. LOADING, FIRING, AND UNLOADING 



10. Operational Tests Before firing 

Warning: Refore making the following tests inspect to insure 
that the magazine is removed and the chamber is empty, 

a. Safety Lock. Cock the hammer and press the safety lock up 
into the SAFE position. Grasp the stock so that the grip safety 
is depressed and squeeze the trigger three or four times. If the 
hammer falls, the safety lock is not safe and must be replaced. 

&. Grip Safety. Cock the hammer and, being careful not to 

depress the grip safety, point the pistol down, and squeeze the 
trigger three or four times. If the hammer falls, the grip safety 
or sear spring must be replaced. 

c. Half Cock Notch. Pull the hammer rearward until the sear 
engages the half cock notch and squeeze the trigger. If 'the 
hammer falls, the hammer or sear must be replaced. Pull the 
hammer rearward nearly to the full cock notch and let it fall, ft 
should fall only to the half cock notch. 

d. Disconnector. Cock the hammer and push the slide % inch 
lo the rear ; hold the slide in that position and squeeze the trigger. 
Let the slide go forward, maintaining the pressure on the trigger. 
If the hammer falls, the disconnector is worn and must be re- 
placed. Pull the slide all the way to the rear, squeeze the trigger 
and release the slide; the hammer should not fall. Release the 
pressure on the trigger, squeeze it, and the hammer should fall. 
The disconnector prevents the release of the hammer until the 
slide and barrel are fully forward and locked. If the hammer falls 
upon release of the slide, the disconnector should be replaced. 

11. Load 

Draw the pistol from the holster and hold it at the position of 
raise pistol Insert a magazine loaded with from one to 

seven rounds of ammunition. Grasp the slide with the left hand, 
thumb on the right side of slide as shown in figure 20- 
Pull the slide fully to the rear, release, and press the safety lock 
up to the SAFE position with the left, forefinger. 

12. Fire 

To fire the pistol, press the safety lock down to the FIRE 
position with the left thumb to prevent disturbing the firing grip 



21 




Figure 20. Foxition of hatitf.t at load. 

of the right hand. Obtain the correct sight alinement and sight 
picture and squeeze the trigger. To fire successive shots, the 
trigger must be released and squeezed again. When the last 
cartridge from the magazine has been fired, the slide remains 
to the rear. 

13. Unload 

To unload, come to the position of raise pistol. Press the mag- 
azine catch and remove the magazine , If the slide is in 
the forward position, pull the slide to the rear and push the slide 
stop up, Inspect the chamber to insure that the pistol is clear- 
Press the slide stop down, allowing the slide to go forward. Re- 
maining at raise pistol, squeeze the trigger; then holster the 
weapon. 



Section IV. MALFUNCTIONS, STOPPAGES, AND 

IMMEDIATE ACTION 

14. General 

The pistol is a mechanical device and, as parts become worn, 
broken, dirty, or dry, stoppages may occur during firing. Sufficient 
knowledge of malfunctions, stoppages, and immediate action is 

22 



required to find and correct malfunctions or stoppages in a mini- 
mum of time. 

15. Malfunctions 

A malfunction is a failure of the weapon to function satis- 
factorily. Malfunctions are classified as defects in the weapon 
that normally do not cause a break in the cycle of operation. These 
may be discovered when the operational tests are being performed 
{par. 10). The following are some malfunctions and their causes: 

a. The grip safety does not block the trigger; a faulty sear 
spring. 

5. The slide does not remain to the rear after the last round 
is fired ; a worn or broken magazine follower step, slide stop, or a 
weak or broken magazine spring. 

16. Stoppages 

a. A stoppage is any unintentional interruption in the cycle of 
operation. If the pistol stops firing through no fault of the firer, 
or an attempt to fire is made and the weapon does not fire, then a 
stoppage has occurred. 

b. Stoppages are classified in accordance with the eight steps 
in the cycle of operation. Stoppages are usually the result of worn 
parts or improper care of the weapon. A knowledge of func- 
tioning enables the soldier to classify and correct stoppages. The 
following are the main classifications of stoppages and their 
causes : 

(1) Failure to feed. The top cartridge in the magazine is not 
properly positioned behind the barrel and in the path 
of the slide. Caused by — 

(a) Dirty or dented magazine. 

(fc) Weak or broken magazine spring. 

(c) Worn or broken magazine catch. 

(d) Improper assembly (magazine spring backwards). 

(e) Bent magazine follower. 

(2) Failure to chamber. The top cartridge from the mag- 
azine is not fully seated in the chamber. Caused by — 

(a) Dirty chamber. 

(o) Dented cartridge case. 

(c) Weak recoil spring. 

(d) Obstruction in the chamber. 

(e) Lack of lubrication. 



23 



(/) Extractor applying too much pressure on the right 
side of the cartridge.* 
(3) Failure to lock. The barrel locking ribs do not interlock 

with the locking recesses in the slide. Caused by 

(a) Lack of lubrication of operating parts. 

(6) Burred or dirty barrel locking ribs or locking recesses. 

(c) Weak recoil spring. 

(d) Broken barrel link. 

(e) Extractor applying- too much pressure on the right 
side of the cartridge.* 

<4) Failure to fire. The hammer falls but the primer of the 
cartridge is not ignited. Caused by — 

(a) Faulty ammunition, 

(b) Broken firing pin. 

(c) Bent or broken hammer strut. 

(d) Weak mainspring. 

(5) Failure to unlock. The barrel locking ribs do not dis- 
engage from the locking recesses in the slide. Caused 
by— 

(a) Broken barrel link. 

(b) Broken barrel link pin. 

(c) Broken barrel lugs. 

(6) Failure to extract. The cartridge case is not removed 
from the chamber. Caused by- 
fa) Broken or worn extractor. 

(b) Dirty or pitted chamber. 

(7) Failure to eject. The cartridge case is not ejected from 
the pistol. Caused by — 

(a) Faulty extractor (does not position the cartridge case 

for ejection), 
(o) Broken ejector. 

<8) Failure to cock. The hammer does not return to the 
cocked position. Caused by- — 

(a) Worn full cock notch on the hammer. 

(b) Worn sear. 

(c) Defective sear spring. 

(d) Worn or broken disconnector. 



•The extractor groove in steel cased ammunition is shorter than that of 
brass cases. The extractor was designed for use with brass eases. When 
firing with steel cased ammunition, the extractor, in many instances, will not 
fully seat in the extractor groove. This will create friction during the for- 
ward movement of the slide, particularly with tight fitted weapons. Modifi- 
cation of the extractor is permitted only by Ordnance personnel, or specially 
trained Armorers. 

24 



17. Immediate Action 

a. Immediate action is the prompt action taken by the firer to 
reduce a stoppage. The procedure for applying immediate action 
should become instinctive for the soldier armed with the pistol. 
If a stoppage occurs, immediate action is applied automatically 
in an effort to reduce the stoppage without attempting to dis- 
cover the cause at that time. 

6. In the event the slide is fully forward, the hammer falls, 
and the pistol fails to lire, apply immediate action as follows: 

(1) Manually cock the hammer without opening the chamber 
and make one additional attempt to fire. If the pistol 
still fails to fire, wait 10 seconds, and then come to the 
position of raise pistol. Grasp the slide with the thumb 
and first finger of the left hand, keeping the thumb on 
the right side of the slide. Pull the slide rearward 
rapidly, to its full extent. Rotate the pistol to the right 
allowing the un fired round to drop out, release the slide 
and allow it to return to the forward position, chamber- 
ing a new cartridge. 

Caution: Keep the weapon pointed downrange during 
this operation. 

(2) Aim and attempt to fire. 

c. In the event the slid 2 is not fully forward, remove the trigger 
finger from the trigger guard and with the non-firing hand at- 
tempt to push the slide fully forward. If the slide will not move 
forward, proceed as follows: 

(1) Bring the weapon to raise pistol. 

(2) Remove the magazine. 

(3) Grasp the slide with the left hand as in inspection arms, 
pull the slide to the rear, and lock it with the slide stop. 

(4) Inspect the chamber. Remove any obstructions. 

(5) Insert another loaded magazine into the pistol. 

(6) Release the slide. 

(7) Aim and attempt to fire. 

d. If the weapon does not fire after application of immediate 
action as outlined above, a detailed inspection should be made to 
determine the cause of the stoppage. 



e. To obviate danger from hangfire, wait 1Q seconds after a misfire, 
then clear the weapon quickly. In the event weapon cannot be 
cleared quickly and the barrel is hot, danger of cook-off exists. Keep 
round locked in chamber, point weapon in a safe direction (for per- 
sonnel and property), and allow weapon to cool before removing 

misfired round. 

25 



18. Cleaning Materials, Lubricants, and Rust Preventives 
a. Cleaving Materials. 

(1) Cleaning compound, solvent (rifle bore cleaner), is used 
to clean the bore and the face of the slide after firing. 
It dissolves corrosive primer salts and removes powder 
ash and carbon. This cleaner has preservative properties 
and provides temporary protection against rust. 

Caution: Rifle bore cleaner is usable at temperatures 
of minus 20" Fahrenheit and higher. Do not mix water 
with rifle bore cleaner. This destroys its preservative 
qualities and impairs its value as a cleaner. 

(2) Hot soapy water may be used to clean the bore when 
rifle bore cleaner is not available. One-quarter pound of 
soap dissolved in one gallon of water makes a desirable 
cleaning solution. After using the solution, dry the 
barrel thoroughly and apply a light coat of oil. 

(3) Volatile mineral spirits, paint thinner, and dry-cleaning 
solvent are noncorrosive solvents used for removing oil, 
grease, or light rust-preventive compounds from 
weapons. Apply these cleaning agents with a rag to 
large parts, and use it as a bath for small parts. 

Caution: These solvents are highly flammable. Do 
not smoke when using them. Continuous contact with 
them will dry the skin and may cause irritation. 

(4) Decontaminating agents are used under special condi- 
tions to remove chemical agents 

(5) The swab, small arms cleaning, is a good grade of un- 
bleached, single-base, napped flannel cotton. Swabs are 
in the form of cut patches, 2U inches square, and are 
used for the cleaning of bores of small arms. 

(6) Rags, wiping, cotton, are soft and absorbent cloth, 
usually composed of light clothing rags, free from dust, 
alkali, and corrosive agents. Rags are used to clean 
small arms and other items of equipment. 

b. Lubricants. 

(1) Lubricating oil, general purpose, PL medium, is a highly 



26 



refined, nonhardening mineral oil containing a rust 
inhibiting additive. It. forms a relatively heavy film 
that resists direct action of salt spray. This makes it 
useful for coating all parts of a weapon before am- 
phibious operations. It should be used in preference to 
lubricating oil, general purpose, PL special, only when 
the weapon is exposed to salt water, high humidity, or 
high temperatures. This oil should not be used in tem- 
peratures beiow freezing. 

(2) Lubricating oil, general purpose, PL special, is a thin 
oil used for lubricating at below freezing temperatures, 
and for providing temporary protection against rust 
When this oil is used, moving parts of weapons must be 
inspected frequently to make sure that they have an 
adequate film of lubricant. 

(3) Engine oil, SAE 10, may be used when preservative 
lubricating oils cannot be obtained. In cold weather, anv 
heavy oil will cause sluggish operation, and may prevent 
the pistol from functioning properly. Engine oil does 

not contain the rust-preventive properties of lubricating, 
preservative oils. When engine oil is used, the pistol 
must be inspected, cleaned, and oiled frequently. 

''■ Daily Preventive Maintenance 

a. Damp air and sweaty hands are great promoters of rust. 
Pistols should be cleaned and protected with oil after every drill 
or handling. The pistol should be inspected each day and cleaned 
if necessary. 

^ b. To clean the pistol, rub it with a rag lightly saturated with 
oil, and then rub with a dry rag. Clean the bore with a swab 
saturated with oil. then with a dry swab. Dust out all crevices 
with a small, clean brush. 

c. To protect the pistol after it has been cleaned, cover all the 
surfaces, including the bore and chamber, with a light coat of 
lubricating, preservative oil. 

d. After cleaning and oiling the pistoi, place it in the pistol 
rack. The use of canvas or similar covers is prohibited, since 
they collect moisture, which rusts the metal. 

20. Care and Cleaning Before Firing 

Before the pistol is fired, the bore and chamber and exterior 
parts of the receiver of the pistol should be cleaned and dried. 
The guide rails on the receiver and the grooves on the slide should 
be lubricated with oil. A light coat of oil should be placed on all 



27 



other interior metal parts except those that come into contact 
with ammunition. Excess oil should be removed from the grips 
and the grip area of the receiver to aid the firer in gripping the 
weapon. 

21. Care and Cleaning After Firing 

The pistol must be cleaned as soon as practicable on the day of 
firing and daily for the next three days, or longer if necessary, in 
the following manner: 

a. Disassemble the pistol. 

b. Clean all parts with a rag lightly saturated with oil. Dry 
all parts and apply a light coat of oil. 

c. Clean the bore and chamber as follows: 

(1) Wet a swab with rifle bore cleaner and run it back and 
forth through the bore several times. 

(2) Attach the pisol bore brush to the cleaning rod and run 
it through the bore and chamber several times. 

(3) Run dry swabs through the bore and chamber until they 
are clean. 

(4) Inspect the bore for cleanliness. If it is not free of all 
residue, repeat the cleaning process. 

(5) When the chamber and bore are clean, coat them with 
rifle bore cleaner and leave overnight. 

(6) Assemble the pistol. 

(7) Perform the test for correct assembly 

(8) Apply a light coat of oil to the exterior surfaces of the 
pistol. 

(9) After the third daily cleaning, if the bore and chamber 
are clean, remove the rifle bore cleaner and replace with 
a light eoat of lubricating, preservative oil. 

22. Care and Cleaning Under Unusual Climatic Conditions 

a. Cold Weather. 

(1) In temperatures below freezing, it is necessary that the 
moving parts of the weapon be kept free from moisture. 
Excess oil on working parts will solidify and cause 
sluggish operation or complete failure. 

<2) Before cleaning, allow the weapon to attain room tem- 
perature. Perform detailed disassembly and clean with 
dry-cleaning solvent or mineral spirits before use in 
temperatures below 0- F. Working surfaces that show 
signs of wear may be lubricated by rubbing lightly with 
a rag that has been wet with oil, lubricating, general 
purpose, PL special- 

28 



b. Hot Weather. 

(1) In tropical climates where temperature and humidity 
are high, or where salt air is present, and during rainy 

seasons the weapon should be inspected daily and kept 
lightly oiled. It should be disassembled daily and all 
parts dried and oiled. 

(2) In hot, dry climates where sand and dust may get into 
the meehanism and bore, all lubricants should be re- 
moved from the pistol, and it should be disassembled 
daily for thorough cleaning. It should be wiped clean 
as often as required. 

23. Care and Cleaning After a CBR Attack 

a. Before Attack. If a chemical, biological, or radiological 
(CBR) attack is anticipated, the following action is taken: Apply 
oil to all outer metal surfaces of the pistol. Do not apply oil to 
the ammunition. If the pistol is not to be used, cover the weapon, 
accessories, and ammunition with protective coverings and place 
them under natural cover. Ammunition should be kept in original 
containers as long as possible before anticipated use. 

b. After Attack. After a CBR attack, determine by means 
of detectors whether or not the equipment is contaminated. A 
complete suit of protective clothing, including protective gloves 
and a gas mask, must be worn during decontamination. If the 
contamination is too great, it may be necessary to discard the 
equipment. Detailed information on decontamination is con- 
tained in FM 21-40 and TM 3-220. 

24. Cleaning Pistols Received From Storage 

Pistols removed from storage are coated with lubricating oil, 
general purpose, preservative, medium, or corrosion-preventive 
compound, class 2, (medium film). Weapons received from ord- 
nance storage are usually coated with corrosion-preventive com- 
pound. Use mineral spirits or paint thinner to remove the com- 
pound or oil. Failure to thoroughly clean all the parts may 
cause a stoppage at below normal temperatures, since the cor- 
rosion-preventive compound will congeal during cold weather. 
After using mineral spirits or paint thinner, dry all parts with 
a dry cloth, and apply a thin film of appropriate lubricating oil. 



29 



Section V. ACCESSORIES 



The names or general characteristics of many of the acces- 
sories required for the pistol indicate their use and application. 
They consist of the hip holster, shoulder holster, and pistol clean- 
ing kit. The pistol kit contains wire bore brushes, cleaning rods, 
pistol screwdrivers, an oiler, and a small brass can in which a 
set of repair parts is carried. 



Section VI. AMMUNITION 

25- General 

a. The soldier armed with the pistol must be familiar with the 
types of ammunition for use in the pistol, ways of identifying 
each type of ammunition, and how to care for, handle, and use it. 

b. A pistol cartridge is a complete assembly consisting of all 
the components necessary to fire the weapon once; that is, the 
cartridge case, bullet, propellant powder, and primer. 

26. Classification of Ammunition 

The contents of original boxes or containers can be identified 
by markings on the box. These markings indicate the number of 
cartridges in the container, the caliber, the type, the code symbol, 
and the lot number. The types, uses and means of identification 

of ammunition for use in the pistol are : 

a. Cartridge, Caliber .45, Kail, Ml 911, is for use against per- 
sonnel and light materiel targets. The ball bullet consists of a 
metal jacket surrounding a lead alloy core. The bullet tip is 
unpainted. 

b. Cartridge, Caliber .45, Blank, MO, is used to simulate fire 
and for salutes. This cartridge can be fired single shot only in 
the pistol- It can be identified by the absence of a bullet and by 
its tapered mouth. 

c. Cartridge, Caliber .45, Dummy, Ml 021, is used for training 
personnel in the operation of loading and unloading the pistol, 
and for testing weapons. It is used also in marksmanship train- 
ing by being mixed with live ammunition during instruction prac- 
tice tiring. This cartridge can be identified by the empty primer 
pocket and two holes in the cartridge case. 

d. Cartridge, Caliber .15, Tracer, M26, is used for observation 

of fire. Secondary uses are for incendiary effect and for signaling. 



30 



The bullet consists of three parts: a copper-plated steel, or guid- 
ing metal-clad, steel jacket; a slug of lead hardened with anti- 
mony; and a tracer mixture in the rear portion of the jacket. 
For identification the bullet is painted red for a distance of 
approximately ^ 16 of an inch from the tip. 

27. Ammunition Lot Number 

At time of manufacture, ammunition is assigned a lot number 
that is marked on all packing containers and is entered on all 
records pertaining to that ammunition. It must be included in 
all reports on the condition and functioning of the ammunition 
and in all reports of accident in which the ammunition is involved. 
Therefore, it is important to retain the lot number with the car- 
tridges after they are removed from their original containers. 
If cartridges cannot be identified by ammunition lot number, 
they are automatically placed in grade 3. Grade 3 ammunition 
is unserviceable ; it will not be fired, but will be turned in to the 
issuing ordnance officer. 

28. Care r Handling, and Preservation of Ammunition 

a. Small arms ammunition is generally safe to handle. How- 
ever, do not allow ammunition boxes to become broken or dam- 
aged. Repair broken boxes immediately. Transfer all original 
markings to the new parts of the box. 

b. Do not open ammunition boxes until the ammunition is to 
be used. Ammunition removed from airtight containers, particu- 
larly in damp climates, is likely to corrode, thereby becoming 
unserviceable. 

c. Use care when opening wooden ammunition boxes, which 
can be continued in use as long as they are serviceable. 

d. Protect ammunition from mud, sand, dirt, and water. If 
it appears wet or dirty, wipe clean with a dry cloth immediately. 
Wipe off light corrosion as soon as it is discovered. Cartridges 
with a heavy coat of corrosion must be turned in to the issuing 

ordnance officer. 

e. Do not oil or polish cartridges. 

/. Do not expose ammunition to the direct rays of the sun for 
any length of time. If the powder is heated, excessive pressure 
will be developed when the weapon is tired. This condition will 
affect accuracy and the operation of the weapon. 

g. Do not attempt to fire cartridges that have dents, scratches, 
loose bullets, or corroded cases. If the cartridge is defective, turn 
it in. Do not throw away or attempt to destroy defective 
ammunition. 

31 



h. Do not strike the primer of a cartridge ; it may ignite and 
cause injury. 

28A Storage of Ammunition 

a. Small arms ammunition is not an explosive hazard • how- 
ever, under poor storage conditions it may become a fire hazard. 

b. Small arms ammunition should be stored away from ail 
sources of extreme heat. 

c. Whenever practicable, small arms ammunition should be 
stored under cover. If necessary to leave ammunition in the open, 
it shou d be raised on dunnage at least six inches from ground 
It should be covered with a double thickness of tarpaulin or suit- 
able canvas. The cover should be placed so that it gives maximum 
protection, yet allows free circulation of air. Suitable trenches 
should be dug to prevent water from flowing under the 
ammunition. 

29. Precautions in Firing Ammunition 

The precautions concerning the firing and handling of ammuni- 
tion in the field prescribed in AR 385-63 and TM 9-1990 must 
be observed. Precautions particularly applicable to small arms 
ammunition include the following: 

ft. No small arms ammunition will be fired until it has been 
positively identified by ammunition lot number and grade. 

b. Before firing, the firer must be sure that the bore of the 
pistol is free from any foreign matter. Firing a pistol with any 
obstruction in the bore will result in damage to the weapon and 
possible injury to the firer. 

30. Hangfire 

ft. A hangfire is a delay in the functioning of a propelling 
charge or explosive train at the time of firing. The amount of the 
delay is unpredictable but in most cases will be from a fraction 
of a second to several seconds. Thus, a hangfire cannot be dis- 
tinguished immediately from a misfire and therein lies the prin- 
cipal danger— that of assuming that a failure of the weapon to 
fire immediately is a misfire when in fact it proves to be a hang- 
fire. For this reason, the time interval of 10 seconds should be 
observed before the slide is opened after a failure to fire. 

Caution: During the prescribed time interval keep the pistol 
pointed toward the target. 

b. If the slide is fully forward and the pistol fails to fire 
recock the hammer without opening the chamber, and make one 



32 



additional attempt to fire. If the pistol still fails to fire wait 10 
seconds before pulling the slide to the rear to remove the car- 
tridge from the chamber. 

c. When a hangfire occurs in any lot, use of the ammunition 
in that lot should be withdrawn and replaced by serviceable 
ammunition. 



33 



CHAPTER 3 
MANUAL OF ARMS FOR THE PISTOL 



31 . General 

a. Pistol movements are not executed in cadence. 

b. During the manual of arms for the rifle, personnel armed 
with the pistol remain at attention except when the command 
INSPECTION ARMS or PRESENT ARMS is given. 

c. When PRESENT ARMS is given, the HAND SALUTE is 
executed. 

32. Inspection Arms 

At the command INSPECTION ARMS, execute the following 
movements in sequence. (These movements may be executed 
separately in response to the appropriate command.) 

a. Raise Pistol At the command RAISE PISTOL, unbutton 
the snap fastener of the shoulder holster with the right hand and 
grasp the receiver with the back of the hand facing outward. 
Draw the pistol from the holster. Bring the elbow in to the side 
and hold the forearm at an angle from the vertical, so that the 
hand is as high as, and approximately 6 inches in front of, the 
right shoulder. Hold the receiver with the thumb and last three 
fingers and extend the forefinger outside and along the trigger 
guard. Point the muzzle outward and up at an angle approxi- 
mately 30 degrees from the vertical If wearing a hip 
holster, at the command RAISE PISTOL, unbutton the flap, draw 
the pistol from the hip holster, and assume the position of raise 
pistol, 

b. Withdraw Magazine. At the command WITHDRAW MAG- 
AZINE, without lowering the right hand, turn the pistol slightly 
to the right and press the magazine catch with the right thumb 

With the left hand, remove the magazine and place it 
between your belt and outer garment on the left side, with open 
end down and front to the right. 

c. Open Chamber. At the command OPEN CHAMBER, with- 
out lowering the right hand, grasp the slide with the left thumb 
and first two fingers so that the thumb is on the left side of the 
slide and pointing down. Keeping the muzzle elevated, shift 

34 



the grip of your right hand, so that the right thumb engages the 
slide stop; push the slide fully to the rear and engage the slide 
stop in the slide stop recess with the right thumb. Re- 

sume the position of raise pistol, with the slide to the rear. Take 
the magazine out of the belt and hold it in the open hand at the 
height of the belt, with the open end of the magazine to the front 
and the front of the magazine to the left. If the inspect- 

ing officer takes the pistol for inspection, lower the right hand 
smartly to your side as in the position of attention. When the 
inspector is ready to return the pistol, raise the right hand to the 
raise pistol position. 

d. Close Chamber. After the pistol has been inspected, or at 
the command of CLOSE CHAMBER or PORT ARMS, press the 
slide stop down with the right thumb and let the slide go forward. 
Pull the trigger and remain at raise pistol. 

e. Insert Magazine. At the command of INSERT MAGAZINE, 
without lowering the right hand, turn the barrel slightly to the 
right. Grasp the magazine with the first two fingers and thumb 
of the left hand, insert it into the pistol, press the magazine 
upward until it is engaged by the magazine catch, and resume the 
position of raise pistol 

33. Return Pistol 

a. Execute this movement on the command RETURN PISTOL 
or on the command ORDER (RIGHT SHOULDER) ARMS after 
INSPECTION ARMS and PORT ARMS have been given. 

b„ Upon the command of execution, lower the pistol to the 
shoulder holster, raise the snap fastener of the holster with your 
right thumb, insert the muzzle of the pistol into the holster, and 
thrust it home. Button the snap fastener of the holster with the 
right hand. When wearing a hip holster, at the command RE- 
TURN PISTOL, return the pistol to the holster, directly from the 
position of raise pistol. 



35 



CHAPTER 4 
MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING 



Section I. GENERAL 



34. Introduction 



The primary use of the pistol is to engage an enemy at close 
range with quick, accurate fire. Accurate shooting is the result of 
knowing and correctly applying the important elements of marks- 
manship. 

35. Fundamentals of Marksmanship 

The important elements of marksmanship are — 

a. Aiming (sight alinement and sight picture). 

b. Positions (grip of the pistol and body positions). 

c. Trigger squeeze. 

36. Phases of Training 

a. Marksmanship training is divided into two phases— 

(1) Preparatory marksmanship training. 

(2) Range firing. 

6. Each of the two phases may be divided into separate instruc- 
tional steps. All marksmanship training must be progressive. 



Section II. PREPARATORY MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING 
37. General 

a. A thorough course in preparatory marksmanship training 
must precede any range firing. This training must be given to 
all soldiers expected to fire the pistol on the range, including 
those who have previously qualified with the weapon. The soldier 
should develop correct shooting habits before range firing. The 
purpose of preparatory marksmanship training is to establish 
and correct shooting habits. 

b. Preparatory marksmanship training is divided into seven 
steps which should be taught in the following order: 

(1) Aiming. 

(2) Positions. 

36 



(3) Trigger squeeze. 

(4) Slow fire. 

(5) Rapid fire. 

(6) Quick fire. 

(7) Examination. 

38. Coaching 

a. Throughout preparatory marksmanship training, the coach- 
and-pupil method of training should be used. The ultimate pro- 
ficiency of a pupil depends to a great extent on how well his coach 
performs his coaching duties. The coach assists the firer by — 

(1) Correcting any errors made. 

(2) Insuring that he takes proper firing positions. 

(3) Insuring that he observes all safety precautions. 

b. Duties of the coach during instruction practice and record 
firing are— 

(1) Check to see that the — 

(a) Pistol is cleared. 

(b) Ammunition is clean. 

(c) Sights are blackened. 

(d) Magazines are clean and operational. 

(2) Observe the firer to see that he— 

(a) Takes the correct firing position. 

(b) Loads the pistol properly and only on command. 

(c) Takes up the trigger slack correctly. 

(d) Squeezes the trigger correctly. The coach cannot tell 
by watching the trigger finger whether the shooter 
squeezes or jerks the trigger. The coach must observe 
the firer for signs that indicate that the firer is antici- 
pating the recoil of the weapon. These signs are gen- 
eral nervousness, fluttering of the eyelids, small mus- 
cular spasms around the mouth, nose, and eyes. The 
most obvious indication of faulty trigger squeeze is 
the location of the strike of the bullet in relation to 
the center of the target. It is the coach's duty to 
observe the firer during the firing and look for these 
indications and correct them. 

(e) Calls the shot each time he fires. (Except for quick 
fire and rapid fire.) 

(/) Holds his breath correctly. 

(g) Lowers his pistol and rests his arm when he does not 
fire a round within 8 or 9 seconds. 



37 



(3) If a firer is tense and nervous, have him breathe deeply 
several times to relax. 

(4) After each table of fire is completed, inspect the pistol 
to make sure it is clear. Score the target and record the 
results. 

c. During record firing, coaching is not permitted. No person 
may render or attempt to render the firer any assistance while 
he is taking his position or after he has taken his position at the 
firing point. Each firer must observe the location of his hits and 
assist the coach in scoring. The coach will manipulate the targets 
during rapid fire and quick fire exercises. He will also insure 
that the magazines are loaded with the correct amount of ammuni- 
tion for each firing table. 

39. Aiming 

a. Sight alinement or aiming is placing the front and rear sights 
of the pistol into correct alinement with the eye. For correct 
sight alinement, the firer must center the front sight in the rear 
sight and raise or lower the top of the front sight, so that it is 
level with the top of the rear sight {fig. 21) . 

b. A sight picture is the pattern of the pistol sights in relation 
to the target as seen by the firer when he aims the pistol. A cor- 
rect sight picture consists of correct sight alinement with the 
bull's-eye centered above and appearing to touch the top of the 
front sight (fig. 21). When aiming, the eye cannot focus on three 
objects (rear sight, front sight, bull's-eye) at different ranges. 
Therefore, the last focus of the eye is always on the front sight. 
The front and rear sights will be seen clear and sharp while the 
bull's-eye will appear to be a bit hazy. With correct sight aline- 
ment, the strike of the bullet will be in the bull's-eye even if the 
sight picture is partially off the center but still touches the bull's- 
eye. Since it is impossible to hold the weapon perfectly still, the 
shooter must understand that he must apply trigger squeeze 

and maintain correct sight alinement while the weapon is 
moving in and around the bull's-eye. This movement of the weapon 
is referred to as "wobble area.*' The shooter must trust this 
wobble area or movement and make an effort to keep the wobble 
or movement of the weapon to a minimum. 

c. Correct sight alinement is essential for accuracy, particularly 
with the pistol because of the short sight radius. For example, 

if a Viu-inch error is made in alining the front sight in the rear 
sight, the bullet will miss the point of aim by approximately 15 
inches at 25 meters of range. The l-j^-inch error in sight alinement 

33 



magnifies itself as the range increases; at 25 meters it is magni- 
fied 150 times. 

d. If the firer does not call his shot correctly in range firing, 

he is not concentrating on sight alinement; consequently, he does 

not know what his sight picture is as he fires. To call the shot 

is to state where the bullet should strike the target according to 

the sight picture at the instant the weapon fires: e.g. "high," 

"a little low." "to the left," "to the right," or "bull's-eye." Another 

specific method of calling the shot is the clock system: e.g., 9 
o'clock or 2 o'clock. 

e. It is important to emphasize that holding the breath properly 
is necessary to good marksmanship. Emphasis upon this point is 
required because many men hold their breath improperly or not 
at all. The breath should be held while the firer is aiming and 
squeezing the trigger. While the procedure is simple, it requires 
explanation, demonstration, and supervised practice. To hold the 
breath properly, the firer inhales an ordinary breath, lets a little 
out, and holds the rest by closing the throat. 



40. Positions 

a. General. To assume the proper position for firing, it is 
necessary to know the correct position of the body with relation 

(Continued Page 41) 

fROHT SIGHT 




CORRECT 
SIGHT 

ALIHEilENT 



CORRECT 

MGHT 

PICTURE 

BULL'I-ETE 

TARGCT 




CORRECT 

1ICMT 

PICTURE 
E-TVPC 

TARGET 



Figure 21. Correct sight alinement and sight picture. 



39 



I£f9 «>.cru nring \~OUTSCS 



Instruction Practice Firing Course 

The following tables prescribe the instruction practice to be 
fired from the standing, prone, kneeling, and crouch positions. 
The E target and the 25-yard (standard American) pistol target 
are used in the practice firing. 



Table I. Slow Fire (25-yard standard American pistol target 



Ranee 
(meters) 



15 

25 



Position 



Time 



! Standing None (10 min in record firing) 

Standing None (10 min in record firing) 



ShDtS 



10 
10 



Ranpe 
(meters) 



25 
25 



Table I L Rapid Fire (E target, bobbing (3) 



Position 



Prone 



Time 



12 seconds 



! Kneeling 12 second* 



Shots 



5 
5 



Range 

(meters) 



25 

15 
10 



Table II L Quick Fire (E target, bobbing {3) 



Position 



Time 



I 



Standing: to prone 
Standing to kneeling 
Crouch' 



15 seconds 
15 seconds 

6 seconds 



Shot 6 



4 
4 
2 



Record Firing Course 

a. Tables I, II, and III used in instruction practice firing 
are fired for record in numerical order. 



b, Coaching is not permitted during record firing. 

c. Qualification scores, of a total possible score of 400, are as 
follows : 



Expert 

Sharpshooter 
Marksman _. 



350 
330 
300 



40 



See Ppge 4fl 



to the target and how to grip the pistol correctly. The qualifica- 
tion course is fired from the standing, kneeling, crouch, and 
prone positions. The appropriate positions outlined and illus- 
trated in this paragraph or similar positions 

may be used. The one-hand grip is usea lor nring 
from the standing position- The two-hand grip is used for firing 
from the prone and kneeling positions. 

b, One-Hand Grip. The most important feature of the grip 
is uniformity. For tight shot groups, the grip must be the same 
each time a shot is fired. 

(1) To obtain the correct grip, pick up the pistol and place 
it in the firing hand until the grip safety is pressed into 
the Y formed between the thumb and forefinger of the 
firing hand* The hand should be as high as possible on 
the receiver without having the flesh squeezed between 
the hammer and the grip safety. 

(2) Grip the receiver firmly with the hand and fingers. 
It is important to maintain the same degree of firmness 
throughout the firing, because a change in the firmness 
and position of the grip will change the location of the 

shot group on the target. A tight grip will cause the 
strike of the bullet to be low on the target, and a loose 
grip will cause the shot to hit high on the target There- 
fore, a firm grip throughout the course of fire is essential. 
To obtain a firm grip t the pistol is placed into the Y 
formed by the thumb and forefinger with the main 
spring housing resting firmly in the palm of the hand. 
The lower three fingers are then wrapped around the 
grip with the index finger resting comfortably under 
the trigger guard. The thumb is held up and along the 
left side of the pistol with enough pressure to steady 
the pistol and to equalize any pressure being exerted on 
the right side of the pistol by the palm and forefinger. 

(3) Place the trigger finger inside the trigger guard so that 
the finger will engage the front surface of the trigger 
(fig. 23). The position of the trigger finger on the trig- 
ger will differ among firers ; however, the closer to the 
second joint of the finger to the point of contact with 
the trigger, the more leverage you can apply to the trig- 
ger. Care should be exercised so that the trigger finger 
does not touch either side of the receiver. Many shooters 
use the first joint or tip of the finger. This area will af- 
ford more sensitivity but less leverage- With the heavy 



41 



trigger pull (5 to 6*4 lb.) on the service pistol, advantage 
is g-ained by using- the best leverage and control of the 
trigger. Each shooter should experiment with the place- 
ment of the trigger finger to ascertain which position of 
the trigger finger gives the best control. The pressure 
of the trigger finger is straight to the rear, with in- 
creasing pressure to cause the weapon to fire. 

c. Two-Hand Grip. The two-hand grip is used for firing from 
the prone or kneeling position. It allows the firer to support the 
one-hand grip thereby attaining more accuracy. The two-hand 
grip is obtained as follows: Grip the pistol as prescribed in b 
above; then firmly close the fingers and thumb of the free hand 
over the firing hand in a manner that will provide maximum 
support (fig. 22). 

d. Standing Position. To assume the standing position, the 
firer faees his target, then faces slightly more than 45 degrees left 
or right. The feet are spread 12 to 18 inches apart, and the weight 
of the body is balanced equally on both feet. The legs are straight 
without stiffness and the hips level. The stance is adjusted so 
that his firing arm points naturally at the target (fig. 23"). After 
he assumes this position, the firer picks up the pistol with his free 
hand and takes the one-hand grip as prescribed in b above. When 
the proper grip is taken, the muscles of the arm are firm without 
being rigid. The pistol slide is a direct prolongation of the firing 




Figure 22. The two-hand grip, 



A1 




Figure 23. Standing position. 



arm, and the wrist is locked so that the weapon cannot search up 
or down. The elbow is straight and locked. The only pivot during 
recoil is that of the shoulder joint. After recoil, when the firer is 
in the correct position, the pistol arm will return to approximate 
alinement with the target. Due to differences of body conforma- 
tion of individuals the standing position may vary slightly, but re- 
gardless of body conformation, the position assumed should be 

43 



relaxed and comfortable. The pistol, held in the firing position, 
■should point naturally and without undue effort at the center of 
the target. Unless the body, the pistol, and the target are in cor- 
rect almement, the firer will be tense while aiming and firing each 
shot. Muscular tension, in turn, causes trembling, excessive fa- 
tigue, and movement of sights in the target area. If this occurs 
the entire body must be moved by shifting the feet until the pistol' 
held in the firing position, points toward the center of the target' 
The position of the body in the standing position is the same for 
firing the revolver. 

e Prone Position. The prone position is used hy the soldier 
to obtain maximum stability when firing at 25-meter targets and 
at onger ranges. This position will be used often in combat as it 
makes a firer a smaller target and makes for maximum accuracy. 
To assume the prone position, the firer drops to his knees and falls 
.orward, breaking his fail with his free hand. He lies flat on the 
ground with legs apart, heels down. The head and body are on a 
hne with the target The arms are extended with the pistol held 
m the two-hand grip (fig. M). 

Caution: The arms must be extended far enough to prevent the 
shde from striking the firer in the face during "recoil. This pre- 
caution also applies in the kneeling position. 

/. Kneeling Position. The kneeling position is used to obtain 
increased accuracy, in rapid fire, at longer ranges. To assume the 
kneelmg position, the firer kneels on the right knee and rests his 
left upper arm on the raised left knee (which is pointed toward 




\> d 

%&4 








I 




Figure >.',, The prone position; two-hand grip. 



44 



the target), with the elbow projecting beyond the knee to give 
support. The weight of the body is distributed on the calf of the 
right leg and heel of the right foot. The receiver of the pistol,- held 
in the one-hand grip, is then seated on the palm of the left hand 
and the two-hand grip is used (fig. 25). Men who shoot left- 
handed will reverse the position. 

g. Crouch Position, Point Fire. The crouch position is used 
when surprise targets are engaged at close range. The body is in 
a forward crouch (boxer's stance) with the knees bent slightly 
and trunk bent forward from the hips. The feet are placed natural- 
ly in a position that w^ill allow another step toward the target. At 
all times, the body should be maintained in a balanced position, 
facilitating rapid movement in any direction. The : pistol is 




Figure .iS. Knvi'ling position: two-hand 



grip. 



45 



extended straight toward the target, and the wrist ami elbow of 
the firing arm are locked 

h. Pisftti} lUudij Position, in the pistol ready position, the pis- 
tol is held in the one-hand grip. The upper arm is held close to the 
body, and the forearm is in a horizontal position. The pistol is 
pointed toward the target area as the firer moves forward. 



41. Trigger Squeeze 

a. General. Poor shooting is generally caused by the aim being 
disturbed before the bullet leaves the barrel of the pistol. This is 
usually the result of the firer jerking the trigger or flinching. 
The trigger does not have to be jerked violently to spoil the aim ; 
even a slight off-center pressure of the trigger finger on the 
trigger is enough to cause the pistol to move and disturb the 
firer's sight alinement. Flinching is a subconscious reflex caused 
by the firer's anticipating the recoil of the weapon. Jerking is 
an effort by the firer to fire the pistol at the precise time the 
sights aline with the target. Flinching and jerking will cause the 
strike of the bullet to hit the lower left section of the target for 
a right-hand shooter. Heeling is caused by a firer's tightening 
the large muscle in the heel of the hand to keep from jerking the 
trigger. A firer who has had difficulty with jerking the trigger 
will attempt to correct the fault by tightening the bottom of the 
hand, which results in a heeled shot. Heeling will cause the 
strike of the bullet to hit on the top right section of the target. 
The firer can correct all these shooting errors by understanding 
and applying correct trigger squeeze. Correctly applied trigger 
squeeze imparts no unnecessary movement to the pistol. Im- 
proper trigger squeeze will cause more misses on the target than 
any other single step of preparatory marksmanship training, 

o. Definition of Trigger Squeeze. Trigger squeeze may be de- 
fined as the independent movement of the trigger finger apply- 
ing a uniformly increasing pressure on the trigger, straight to 



46 



the rear, without disturbing the sight alinement until the pistol 
fires. The trigger slack, or free play, is taken up first and the 
squeeze is continued steadily until the hammer falls. If the 
trigger is squeezed properly, the firer will not know wlien the 
hammer will fall; thus, he will not know when to flinch or heel. 
To apply correct trigger squeeze, the trigger finger may contact 
the trigger anywhere from the tip to the second joint, depending 
on the length of the trigger finger. If pressure from the trigger 
finger is applied to the right side of the trigger or pistol, the 
strike of the bullet will be to the left. This is due to the normal 
hinge action of the fingers. When the fingers of the right are 
closed, as in gripping, they hinge or pivot to the left, thereby 
applying pressure to the left. (With the left hand, this action 
is to the right.) The firer must exercise care in the squeeze of 
the trigger, so as not to apply pressure left or right but straight 
to the rear. The method of trigger squeeze used by the firer will 
determine his marksmanship ability as follows: 

(1) The man who has learned to apply pressure on the 
trigger only when the sights are in alinement with the 
target, who holds the pressure if the muzzle swerves, 
and continues to add pressure when the sights are again 
in line with the target is an excellent shot. 

(2) The man who holds the sights of the pistol as nearly 
on the target as possible and continues to squeeze the 
trigger with a uniformly increasing pressure until the 
pistol fires, is a good shot, 

(3) The man who tries to "catch his target" as his sight 

alinement moves past the target, and fires the pistol 
at that instant, is a very bad shot. 

c. Calling Shot. To call the shot is to state where the bullet 
should strike the target according to the sight picture at the 
instant the pistol fires; for example: "high," "a little low," "to 
the left," "to the right," or "bull's-eye." Another specific method 
of calling the shot is the clock system ; for example : a 9 ring hit 
at 8 o'clock, and 8 ring hit at 3 o'clock. Another good method of 
calling a shot is to provide the shooters with a target center. 
{Placed beside him on the firing line) and as soon as the shot 
is fired the shooter is required to place a finger on the target face 
or center at the point where he expected the round to hit on the 
target. This method eliminates guessing and computation on the 
part of the shooter, and the immediate action of placing the finger 
on the target face will give a more accurate call. If the soldier 
does not call his shots correctly in range firing, he is not properly 
concentrating on sight alinement and trigger squeeze, and con- 



47 



sequently does not know what his sight picture is as the weapon 

fires. 



fN 



:_ 




TWENtr-HYE YARO 



STANDARD AMERICAN PfSTOL TARGET 



\ 



OrAWOF TARGET RINGS 


10 
9 


3.39 IN 


5-54 IN 


8 


B.DO IN 


7 


TU-DO IN 


6 


14.50 IN 


5 


19.68 IM 



\ 



k 



4 
I 

I 

1 
I 



J 

I 

I 
I 

1 
I 

I 
I 

-I 



"1 

— -s 

1 BOOT | 



; 



/ 



JtOTES; 

DIMENSIONS ARE FOR THE OUTSIDE 
DIAMETER OF RINGS INCLUDING 
TH£ WJDTH OF WHITE OR BLACK 
LINES 

WIDTH OF WHITE LINE .04 

WIDTH Or BLACK LINES JO 



^ 



J 




Figure 2d. Standard American 25-yard pistol target mounted on £ target. 



4B 



'See Pages 40 f 128) 



CHAPTER FIVE — INSPECTION, DETAIL DI5ASSEMBIY, 

REPAIR AND REPLACEMENT 



Section I 
INSPECTION PRIOR TO DISASSEMBLY 



42. GENERAL. 

Inspections prior to disassembly include a careful visual inspection of 
the assembled pistol, trigger pull tests, and four safety tests. 

CAUTION: When a pistol is received ior repairs, make certain that 

the chamber is unloaded. It is possible thai a cartridge has become 

jammed so that the pistol is in a dangerous condition when received. 

Proceed with caution when removing the damaged cartridge. It should 

be removed by inserting a cleaning rod into the muzzle and pushing 
the cartridge out. 

43. VISUAL INSPECTION. 

bu The pistol is inspected as a unit to note its general appearance, 
the action of the slide, and the smoothness of operation. The alinement 
of sights is also verified. Examination is made for split stocks and miss- 
ing stock screws. 

44. TRIGGER PULL TESTS* 

a. Trigger pull tests are made to determine the number of pounds 
pull required to move the trigger causing the hammer to fall. To make 
the test, the hammer is cocked and the grip safety depressed. Two 
weights and a piece of wire are 

required to make the tests- The wire should be looped at one end so 
that it will hook over the trigger without contacting the side of the 
pistol. Its lower end should be arranged to hold the necessary weights. 
The pistol is held in the hand in a vertical position, the thumb depress- 
ing the grip safety. With the lighter weight attached to the lower end, 
the wire is then hooked over the trigger; the lower end with the weight 
resting on the bench or fioor. The pistol is then lifted carefully. This 
weight should not cause the hammer to falL It is then replaced by the 
heavier weight which should cause the hammer to fall. If the lighter 
weight causes the hammer to fall, the trigger pull is below the specified 
limit. If the heavier weight does not cause it to fall, the pull is too 
heavy. In either case, correction of trigger pull must be made {par. 51 b). 

45. SAFETY TESTS. 

a. The following safety tests should be performed on each pistol 
prior to disassembly: 

49 



SAFETY LOCK 
UP 




figure 27.— Pistol M1911A1. Hammer Bock. Safety LocJr Upward 
in Safety Position, Hand Grasping Stock So Grip Safety 

h Depressed, Finger Squeezing Trigger 

(1) Safety Lock Test (fig. 27). With the pistol unloaded, cock the 
hammer and press the safety lock upward into the safe position. Grasp 
the stock so that the grip safety is depressed and squeeze the trigger 




Figure 2s.— Pistol M19UA1. Hammer Cocked, Grip Safety 

Not Depressed, Finger Squeezing Trigger 

50 




Figure 29 — Pistol M1911A1, Hammer at Half 'Cock Notch, 

Finger Squeezing Trigger 




Figure SO, 



Pistol MT9MJI. Hammer Back Nearly to Full Cock. 
Thumb Slipping Off Hammer 



tightly three or four times. If the hammer falls, the safety lock is not 
safe and must be repaired. 

(2) Grip Safety Test (fig. 28). With the pistol unloaded, cock the 
hammer, and without depressing the grip safety, point the pistol 

51 








gyp =■■=*■ 



Figure si. 



Pistol M1911A1, Hammer Cocked, Slide Partly Sack, 
Finger Squeezing Trigger 



downward and squeeze the trigger three or four times. If the hammer 
falls or the grip safety is depressed by its own weight, the grip safety 
is not safe and must be repaired. 

(3) Half-Cock Test- (fig. 29.). With the pistol unloaded, draw back 
the hammer until the sear engages the hall-cock notch. Then squeeze 
the trigger. If the hammer falls, the hammer or sear must be replaced 
or repaired. Draw the hammer back nearly to full cock and then let 
it slip (fig. SO). It should tail only to half cock, otherwise it should be 
replaced- 

(4) Disconnector Test (fig. ji ). With the pistol unloaded, cock 

the hammer. Shove the slide i/ 4 inch to the rear, and holding it in that 
position, squeeze the trigger. Let the slide go forward, maintaining the 
pressure on the trigger. If the hammer falls, the disconnector is worn 
on top and must be replaced. Pull the slide all the way to the rear and 
engage the slide stop. Squeeze the trigger and at the same time release 
the slide. The hammer should not fail. If it does the disconnector is 
faulty (fig. so.). Now release the pressure on the trigger and then 
squeeze it The hammer should then fall. If it does not check the sear 
spring for weakness, and if not weak, then the disconnector is faulty. 
The disconnector normally prevents the release of the hammer unless 
the slide and barrel are in the forward position, safely interlocked. This 
also prevents the firing of more than one shot at each squeeze of the 
trigger. 

52 




Figure 32— Putol M 1911 A 1, Slide Fully Back, Slide Stop Engaged, 
Finger Squeevng Trigger, Thumb Releasing Slide, Hammer Back 



53 










5 



01 



t?5 



E 



4 



^ 

5 



a 

Qi 




^ y s 



c 



oe o 



*b8 

^ U £ 



a o> 



-I 



Of 



■o 
a. 



On 

3 



o 

O 



4 






54 



55 



RECEIVER 



SPRING, 

MAGAZINE 

CATCH 



LOCK, 

MAGAZINE 

CATCH 



SCREW 
STOCK 



STOCK, 

LEFT 



DJ5CONNECTOR 




HAMMER 



STRUT, 
HAMMER 



MAfNSPRING 



PIN, 

MAINSPRING 

CAP 



SAFETY, 
GRIP 



HOUSING, 
MAINSPRING 



Figure 35. — Receiver Group of Phtoi M1911A1 — . Exploded View 

56 




z 



« 



O 













LLI JJ 

llj a. 




5 



E 

a. 

o 

I 



57 



Section 

DETAIL 

DISASSEMBLY 



46. DISASSEMBLY OF PISTOL 

a* To disassemble the pistol, proceed as follows: 

(1) Remove the magazine by pressing the magazine catch. Press 
the recoil spring plug inward and turn the barrel bushing clockwise until 
the recoil spring plug and the end of the recoil spring protrude from their 
seat (fig. 57 ). This releases the tension of the recoil spring. The finger 
and thumb should be kept over the recoil spring plug so that it will not 
jump away and be lost or strike the operator. 

(2) Draw the slide rearward until the middle notch of the slide 
stands above the projection on the thumb piece of the slide stop (fig 
:i S y Now press gently against the end of the pin of the slide stop which 
protrudes from the right side of the receiver above the trigger guard 




Figure *7.— Removing RecojJ Spring Plug from Pistol M1911A1 



58 




Figure 38. — Lining Up Slide Stop of Pistol M1911A1 



Push the slide stop from the right side and pull it out from the left 
side (fig. ?$) This releases the barret link, allowing the barrel with 
the link and the slide assembly to be drawn forward, together, from 
the receiver. 

(3) Withdraw the recoil spring plug from the recoil spring by twist- 
ing counterclockwise slightly. Then pull out the spring and spring guide 
from the rear of the slide. 

(4) Next, turn the barrel bushing counterclockwise until it may be 
drawn forward from the slide (fig. $0). This releases the barrel, which 
with the barrel link, may be drawn forward from the slide. By pushing 
out the barrel link pin, the barrel link is released from the barrel. 

(5) Press the rear end of the firing pin forward w r ith a small punch 
until it clears the firing pin stop. The stop can then be drawn downward 
from its seat in the slide. The firing pin and firing spring are then 
removed from the rear of the slide. The finger and thumb should be 
kept over the spring so it will not jump away. The extractor is pried 
out to the rear with a punch or screwdriver. This completes the dis- 
assembly of the slide 

59 




Figure ,;& -~ Removing 



Sfop Pin from Phtol MI91MI 




V 



Figure jo. — Removing Barrel Bushing from Pistol MWIMI 



60 




Figure 41- — Removing Safety Lock from Pistol MI91MI 

(6) The safety lock (thumb safety) is readily withdrawn from the 
receiver by cocking the hammer, placing the lock. midway between the 
upper and lower positions (fig. 41-), and pushing from the right on the 
pin part 

(7) After removing the hammer pin from the left side of the re- 
ceiver, lower and remove the cocked hammer with the hammer strut. 

CAUTION: Retard the hammer with the thumb to avoid breaking it. 

(8) Push or drive the mainspring housing pin from the right side 
of the receiver by placing a punch on the recessed end of the pin- This 
allows the mainspring housing to be withdrawn downward and the 
grip safety rearward from the handle. The sear spring may then be 
removed- By pushing out the sear pin from the right to the left side 
of the receiver, the sear and disconnector are released. To remove the 
mainspring, mainspring cap, and housing pin retainer from the main- 
spring housing, mount the housing in a vise having protected jaws, com- 
press the mainspring by placing a punch on the mainspring cap, and 
push out the mainspring cap pin with a small drift 

b. Old Style Magazine Catch Lock. Special care should be used 
when removing the magazine catch from the receiver. Its checkered 
left end must be pressed inward flush with the receiver. Its right end 

61 




JS. 



iX^. 



* * 



>'" 






"*. 



1 v_ 



V 



> r 




Figure 



ii, 



D/sassembJing Old Design MogazJne Cofch 
from Pistof MF9J] 



will then project so far from the right sade of the receiver that it may 
be rotated counterclockwise one-hair turn (fig. ji. ). This movement will 
release the magazine catch lock from its seat in the receiver, when the 
catch, the catch lock, and the spring may be removed. Note that the 
magazine catch pin is removed by pushing and rotating it as indicated 
above. It is not a screw. 

e. IVew Stylr Magazine l!alHi Lwk. With the improved design of 
magazine catch lock, the operation of dismounting the magazine catch 
is simplified. Press the magazine catch inward and turn the magazine 

catch lock a quarter turn counterclockwise by means of a screwdriver 
(fig. 49 ). The magazine catch with its contents can then be removed. 
The improved design will be recognized from the fact that the head of 
the magazine catch lock is slotted. 

(1) The trigger can now be removed rearward from the receiver. 

(2) The long arm of a screwdriver can be used to push out all the 
pins except the mainspring cap pin. the lanyard loop pin. and the ejector 
pin, For these pins, a drift of proper size must be used. 

(3) The slide stop plunger, the safety lock plunger, and the plunger 
spring may be pushed to the rear, out of The plunger tube. 

62 



SAFETY LOCK MIFFING OUT 
MAINSPRING HOUSING PIN 




Figure 45. Hold the hammer, squeeze the trigger, and ease the hammer 
forward. Using the safety lock as a drift, press out the mainspring 
housing pin. 



GRIP SAFETY 




Figure 44- To rcmor>e the grip safety, slide the mainspring housing down 
about Vi inch a?id lift out the grip safety. Remove the mainspring 
housing fty sliding it from the receiver. Disassemble the mainspring 
housing only when necessary for c3caJiinff m 

63 




>* 









Figure J5. Li/i owt tfce near spring. 



HAMMER PIN 




i % 




Figure 46. Remove the hammer pin from tkr (eft side of the receiver. 



64 



HAMMER 



S*AR PIN 




^ 



Figure fl m Lift the hammer from the receiver. Drift out the hammer strut 
pin and separate the parts. {Caution: If the hammer strut 

pin is peened in place, do not remove it.). Remove the sear pin from 
ike left side of receiver. Elevate the front end of the receiver and 
allow the sear and disconnector to drop iff to the hand,. 



SAFETY LOCK PLUNGER 




Figure 48- Withdraw the safety lock piuuger t slide stop plunger, and 

plunger spring. Remove the stock screws and stocks from the receiver. 

65 



MAGAZJNE CATCH 




Figure 43 1 Press the magazine catch in until if is flush with the left side 
of the receiver. Using the xhort Jraf of the sear spring as a screw- 
driver, htm the fork % turn eounterctockieise. The lock should turn 
easily. If it docs not check to stc that the magazine catch is flush 
with the left side of the receiver. Force should not he vxed to turn 
the lock. Lift out the magazine coteh. (Caution: Do not use the 
long leaf of the sear spring as a screwdriver.) To disassemble the 
magazine cateh, turn the lock clockwise and separate the parts. Re- 
move the trigger by ekmting the front end of the receiver. 






iih.'. 






r* 




HAMMER STRUT 



HR1NG PIN STOP 



Figure 50. Using the hammer stmt as a drift, press in on the firing pin 
and rrmorr the tiring pin xtttp. Itrmove the firing pin and firing pin 
spring. Separate the tuo parts. 

66 



EXTRACTOR 



HAMMER STRUT 



: ■ -. 






% 



*\ 



Figure 51. With the hammrr strut, pry ovt and remove the extractor. 







1. FIRING PIN STOP 

2. FIRING PIN 

3. FIRING PIN SPRING 

4. EXTRACTOR 

5. SLIDE 




Figure St. Parts of the slide in ctder of detailed disassembly. 

67 




1. SAFETY iOCK 

2. MWN5PSWG HOUSING PIN 

3. G«P SAFETY 

4. MAINSPRING HOUSING 

5. MAINSPRING CAP RETAINS! PIN 

6. MAINSPRING 

7. SEA* 5PRP+G 
B. HAMMER PIN 



*. HAMMER 

10. HAMMER STRUT FIN 

11. HAMMER 5TRUT 

12. UAH PIN 

13. DISCONNECTOR 
34. SFAR 

)S. MAGAZINE CATCH 

1"S MAGAZINE LOCK AN© SPRING 



17. TRIGGf* 

1* SAFETY LOCK PLUNGER, SUDE 

5T0V PLUNGER, AND SPRING 
}9. STOCK SCREW 
VK STOC* 
31, EJECTOR 
72. RICflVW 



Figure 5S. Parts of the receiver group in order of detailed disassembly 




1. MAGAZINE TUBE 

2. MAGAZINE BASE 

3. FOILOWER 



4. 
5. 
6. 



FOLLOWER STEP 

MAGAZINE SPRING 

FOLLOWER END OF 
MAGAZINE SPRING 



Figure S4* The magazine assembly shown in detailed disassembly. 



66 




Figure 55. 



Disassembling New Design Magazine Catch 
from Pistot MI9IMI 



47, DISASSEMBLY OF MAGAZINE. 

a. Ordinarily the magazine should not be disassembled except for 
cleaning or to replace the magazine follower or the magazine spring- 
When it is required, proceed as follows: 

(1) Push the magazine follower downward about l A inch. This 
compresses the magazine spring. Hold the magazine spring by inserting 
the end of a drift through one of the small holes in the side of the 
magazine and then slide out the magazine follower. Hold the hand over 
the end of the magazine before removing the drift from the hole in 
order to prevent the magazine spring from jumping out of the magazine. 
(The floor of the magazine may also be removed by knocking out the 
two floor plate pins, but this is done only in making emergency repairs.) 



69 



Section 



INSPECTION AFTER COMPLETE DISASSEMBLY 



48. CAUSES OF MALFL\CTIONING. 

a. Important causes of malfunctioning of the parts of the pistol are 
as follows: 



(1) Major Moving Parts. 

Par* 

Barrel bushing, (fig. SB.) 
Recoil spring 
Mainspring housing 
Sear spring 
Sear 

Hammer, (fig. 57.) 



Condition to b# Check*d 

Burs- 
Tension, 

Burs and tension of mainspring- 
Tension and broken leaves. 
Worn nose or tip and breakage and 

wear of lugs- 
Worn sear notches and broken ham* 

mer strut. 



TENSION 

i 



\MAAW/MA/#^yvw/ , /wwvyw 



broken 

OR BENT 



BURS 




WORN 
NOSE 




BURS 



B 




TENSION 

C 




TENSION AND 
BROKEN LEAVES 



Figure 56. — Showing Points to Be Inspected On: 

o. iarrri bushing; b. S««r; c. Mataprfng; A Malospi-fog ftoutfaf. 

•. S*or spring; i, ftcceH tprlng 

70 




1 




M 

» 

IS 

« i 

ca i 



£ w 



O 

Z 



o 




5 **• 



£ 



u. *c 



71 



6URR5 



KINK5 AND TENSION 




y 



4t 




D£NT$ 



SURRS 



o 



at 



55 

L 






Figure 55. — Magazine of PrstoJ M19IM! — Exploded View 

SAowing Pomts to Be Inspected 



Port 

Disconnector 
Trigger 
Firing pin 
Firing pin spring 
Extractor 
Receiver (fig, ja) 

Slide 



Condition +o be Chvcfced 

Burs or wear. 
Burs or bending. 
Short length or wear. 
Tension- 
Broken or weak claw. 

Burs, loose ejector, and defacement of 
markings. 

Burs on recoil gmdeways and locking 

recesses, and front and rear sight 




BURRS 



BURRS 



figure 6#, 



72 



Exterior of Muzzle End of Barrel of Pistol M1911A1 
Showing Points to Be Inspected 

73 



r 




Section IV, 



REPAIRS AUD REPLACEMENTS 



Figure $1- — Interior of Barret of Pistol M1911A1 Showing Slight 

Pitting f But Free from Bulges) and Sharp Lands 



r~\ 




Figure 62. 



Inferior of Barrel of Pistol M1911A1 Snowing Piffrng 

and Dull Lands 




If Ihe lands are pitted and have lost their sharpness, the barrel 
will be inaccurate and should be replaced. This is due to neglect- 
Fignre 63. — Interior of Barrel of Pistol M 197 MI Snowing Piffrng, 

Worn Lands, and Burs on Interior of Muzzle 



(2) Magazine. 

The magazine as a unit 

(fig. 59.) 
Magazine spring 
Magazine follower 



Burs and dents. 

Kinks and tension. 
Burs and bending. 



(3) Barrel. Inspection of the barrel, causes for rejection, and 
method of examination are as follows: 

(a) Burs on the exterior rim of the muzzle should be stoned off. If 
on the interior, the barrel should be rejected (fig. 60). 

(b) If the barrel is free from pits and bulges and the lands are 
sharp and distinct, the barrel is serviceable (fig. 61.). 

(c) If the barrel is pitted, but free from bulges and has sharp lands, 
it is still serviceable and will be sufficiently accurate. However, this 
implies that the barrel has not been given proper care and should be so 
reported (fig. «;?). 



49 GENERAL. 

a. Since all parts of the pistol are standardized as to their dimensions, 
repairs to a large degree consist of making the necessary replacement 
of worn, bent, or broken parts. In some cases, parts can be bent back 
or otherwise returned to their proper shape with satisfactory results. 
This applies to the leaves of the sear spring, the trigger, and the hammer 
strut. A worn sear notch in the hammer may be corrected by stoning or 
filing. Dents in the magazine usually may be removed and the lips 
returned to original shape by bending. Burs on the muzzle of the pistol 
should be stoned off ; 

50. REPLACEMENT Of PARTS. 

a. Where parts or assemblies are broken or worn so as to render 
them unserviceable they must be replaced from stock. Often only parts 
of the assembly will be worn or broken and others can be salvaged. 
However, should it take more time to remove serviceable parts than 
they are worth, the entire assembly should be scrapped. In quantity 
overhauling of pistols, the parts of each should be kept separate for ease 
in determining to which pistol they belong. 

51. REPAIRS. 

a. Burs on cams and on other smooth surfaces should be removed 
to make the part serviceable. A very fine file is used, and care is taken 
to remove as small an amount of metal as possible. Where roughened 
surfaces ai e present on moving parts, an oil stone should be used. 

b. Correction of Trigger Pull. Pistols received from the field usu- 
ally have a trigger pull varying over a slightly wider range than new or 
repaired pistols (par. 2 a for trigger-pull data). Too heavy or too light 
pull may be corrected by stoning the mating surfaces of the sear and 
hammer until they meet squarely. Do not stone off the notch in the 
hammer at an angle as this may decrease the safety of the pistol. The 
trigger pull also may be varied up to approximately \'i pound by bend- 
ing the leaf of the sear spring slightly. The mainspring may require 
replacement if the pull remains too light after making these corrections. 
All pistols should be tested for trigger pull, as outlined in paragraph 44 
after making repairs, and before they are again placed in storage or 

service. 



74 



75 




Section V 



REASSEMBLY 



52, REASSEMBLY OF MAGAZINE. 

a. To reassemble the magazine, proceed as follows; Use a blunt- 
ended tool to compress the magazine spring into the magazine about 
Va inch below the top to permit inserting the end of a drift through 
one of the small holes in the side of the magazine. The spring should 
be held below the slot where the magazine follower enters and leaves 
the magazine. Then insert the magazine follower and withdraw the drift 

53. REASSEMBLY OF PISTOL. 

a. Assemble the slide stop plunger, the safety lock plunger, and the 
plunger spring forward into the plunger tube. 

b. Install the ejector pin, the lanyard loop pin, and the hammer strut. 

c. Push the trigger forward into position through the receiver. 

d. To replace the improved design of magazine catch, insert the 
catch and turn it one-quarter turn to the right with a screwdriver. To 
replace the old type magazine catch, carefully insert it in the receiver, 
press inward and turn it clockwise one-half turn. 



e. To replace the mainspring, mainspring cap and housing pin re- 
tainer in the mainspring housing, insert the retainer, the mainspring and 
cap in the housing, compress the spring with a punch, and insert the 
small cap pin. Do not insert in receiver, see operation h. 

f. To reassemble the disconnector and sear, first place the cylindrical 
part of the disconnector in its hole in the receiver with the flat face or 
lower part of the disconnector resting against the yoke of the trigger (fig. 
64). Then place the sear (lugs downward) so that it straddles the dis- 
connector. By squeezing the trigger slightly, the three parts will snap 
into alinement. Next, insert the sear pin from the right side so that it 
passes through both the disconnector and the sear. 

g- Replace the hammer in the uncocked position and insert the 
hammer pin from the left side of the receiver. 

h. To replace the sear spring (the sear, disconnector and hammer 
being in place and hammer down) 'ocate its lower end in the cut in 

76 




Figure #4 



Reassembling Sear and Disconnector on 
Pistol M1911A1 



■"5* 



r ** 






t 





Figure 65. 



Replacing Sear Spring on Pistol MT9JM1 

77 



r 




Si 
Pi- 



HS'J 




Figure 6S. — Pressing Sofefy LocJc Plunger Home on Pistol MI91 1,41, 
to 4ffow Seofjjig of Safety Lock: Hammer Cocfced 

the receiver with the end of the long leaf resting on the sear {fig. 65). 
Now insert the mainspring housing until its lower end projects below 
the frame about V* inch. Next, put the grip safety into position, cock the 
hammer and replace the safety lock. 

L To assemble the safety lock to the receiver, use a screwdriver to 
press the safety lock plunger home (fig 66. ). This allows the seating of 
the safety Jock. Now release the cocked hammer. (Be sure the strut 
enters the recess in the cap in the housing,) 

j- To reassemble the slide, first insert the firing pin spring, firing pin, 
and extractor into the rear end of the slide. Push the firing pin forward 

until it clears the firing pin stop position and insert the firing pin stop. 
Be sure the extractor is alined to allow the firing pin stop to enter its 
recess. Note that the rounded top edge matches the curve on the surface 
in the slide. 

k. To reassemble the barrel into the slide, push the barrel link into 
position in the barrel and insert the barrel link pin- Now insert the 
barrel in the slide from the forward jnd. Insert the barrel bushing in 

78 




HI 



Figure 67. Replacing Slide and Barret on Receiver, Barrel Li nit 

Tilted Forward and Link Pfn In Place On Pistol M 191 1A1 

the slide and turn counterclockwise until locked. Place the recoil spring 
in position. 

I. Now hold the slide upside down with the barrel outward and push 
the barrel and guide forward as far as possible. Turn the receiver group 
upside down and assemble it to the slide in that position (fig. 67). Make 
sure that the barrel link is tilted forward as far as possible when assem- 
bling the receiver to the slide. Push the receiver forward as far as pos- 
sible. 

m. Turn the pistol right side up, and making sure that the hole in the 
barrel link is lined up with the hole in the receiver, insert the pin end 
of the slide stop from the left side of the pistol. Move the slide forward 
until the projection on the slide stop is opposite the middle notch of the 
slide. Press the slide stop inward and upward into position (fig. 68.), 
Allow the slide to move to its foremost position. 

n. Cock the hammer and engage the safety lock. Place the recoil 
spring plug over the end of the --ecoil spring and push the spring and 

79 




rmi - r^ - 




figure $8 



Reassembling Slide Stop Pin After Replacing Slide 

On Pistol M J 911 4? 



plug into position. Turn the barrel bushing until its lips are alined 
around the plug and release the pressure on the plug, 

o. Insert the magazine by pushing smoothly yet firmly into position 
until it is engaged by the magazine catch. 

54. Test for Correct Assembly 

To test the pistol for correct assembly, pull the slide fully to the 
rear and release it by pushing down on the slide stop; the hammer 
should remain cocked. Hold the pistol in a normal grasp to de- 
press the grip safety and squeeze the trigger. The hammer should 
fall. 



Figure 6&. Damage caused hy firing irith bullet, lodged in bore, caL.^5 automatic 

pistol M 1911. 




BASE OF 2ND BULLET 





CASS HEAD IN CHAMBER 



BULLETS 1 AMD 2-IN BORE 



RA PD 23963 



Figure 69 a Ammunition damaged by bore obstruction in caL.^5 automatic pistol Ml 911 . 

Section vi. EFFECTS AND PROBABLE CAUSES OF 
ACCIDENTS AND MALFUNCTIONS 

55. Typical Cases 

a. Worn and Defective Parts. 

(1) Malfunctions are often caused by the following: 

(a) Burs, dents, kinks, and bending of magazine parte and loss 
of tension in the springs. 

(b) Excessive wear and looseness of moving parts. 

(c) Pits, bulges, rust, burs, and uneven and indistinct lands 
in the barrel 



(2) 



80 



Figure 72 shows damage to 

the breech end of another pistol after the metal had become 
fatigued by long usage. Note the coarse structure of the 
metal at the break. 

81 




a. 
< 









5 

3 



o 

"IS 



GO 

V- 



IS 

55s 
"S3 

si; 
s^i 

S3 



B 



*- 

13 




RAPD 23964 



Figure 7/. Damage frow firing round with double charge of poirdtr, cat $5 automatic 

qmfal Ml 911. 

i. Bore Obstruction* 

(1) Figure 70. shows a pistol in which a normal round was fired 
with grease in the chamber and breech end of the bore. 
The chamber pressure that developed was sufficient to rup- 
ture the head of the cartridge case, releasing the powder 
gases into the action. Note the bulged slide and the damaged 
top round from the magazine. 

(2) Figure 69 pictures the damage caused by firing a normal 
round with a bullet in the bore. A bullet may lodge in the 
bore when fired from a cartridge containing damp powder, 
and some of the powder grains will be unburned. Figure' 6Sa 
shows darkened, unburned powder grains adhering to Che 
base of the lodged bullet. Observe the long split in the barrel 
and the two bullets recovered from the bore. 

<3) The powder charge in the caL.45 pistol cartridge sometimes 
creates insufficient power to expel the bullet from the barrel. 
The lodged bullet will obstruct the passage of the next round 
and blow up the barrel. 



62 



B3 



I * 



ki 



;a^ ; 



O 
O.. 

< 



Oi 



^;* P 



*j 



J.r 



LJf* 



-Sfc 



■ -- l - - r - 



L* 



. y* 



^=1 



•z&-i 



.^ :-|W 



fc *«■& 



r * » - » :■ 



l;v: 



e*-». _-m 



j™tg 



y*= 






*« * ■&- 






»' 



h *» P*» **» s- 



_i--* 




-*. 






o 



e 
^ 



-3 






So 

e 





















3 



v> 




T 



P.O 



3B" 



QfcH 



oo 



2 2: 

28 



I 
f 

y 















2 ; 

it 

£ m 
** > 

- s 

* 5 

II 



i 5 



H * 

\\ 

IB 



a! 

j? 5 

E u 

t • 

a = 

3 * 



£ 

* 



* 5 ! 

if; 



^ _ * 



H 



-A 


* 


c+ 


CM 


7T2" 


— 


v> 


*o 


5 


* 

^ 



c 



*/> 



a: 
O 






84 



65 



SUPPLEMENT "B" TOOLS, GAUGES AND FUTURES 

(PISTOLS MI9FI & Mr9riAF) 



123. Requisitfonable Tools and Gauge; 



a. Gauges. ( 1 ) There are no gauges requisitionable for use by field 

maintenance units. 

(2) The gauges listed below are for base maintenance shop use, and 
are requisitionable from SNL B-20. 

Used to check the diameter of the 
barrel link pin. 



Gauge, snap, nonadjustable, not-go, 
.150 inch (barrel link pin), 41-G- 
339-150, A73 19912 

Gauge, snap, nonadjustable, not-go, 
A 97 inch (slide stop pin), 41-G- 
339-160, A73I9913 

Gauge, snap, adjustable limit, not-go. 
-694 inch (barrel bushing), 4I-G- 
336-400, A73199I4 

Gauge, plug, not-go, double purpose 
(barrel bushing), .582 and .587 
inch (out-of-roundness), 41-G-254- 
393, A731991S 

Gauge, plug, not-go. diameter .704 
inch (barrel bushing seat), 41-G-- 
254-391. A7319916 

ft. Tools. There is only one tool issued for the overhaul and repair 
of the cal. 45 automatic pistol M1911 and M1911A1. This tool is requi- 

sittonable from SNL B-6 for organizational field and base maintenance 

units. 



Used to check the diameter of (he 
slide stop pin. 

Used to check the outside diameter of 
the barrel bushing. 

Used to check the inside diameter of 
the barrel bushing. 



Used to check the inside diameter of 
the barrel bushing seat. 



Screwdriver, pistol, length over-all 
3rV inches, 41 -S-1 062-60, C64149 



Used to disassemble and assemble the 
pistol. 



86 



1 24. Nonrequisitlonable Tools, Weights, and Fixtures 

Listed below are nonrequisitionable weights for checking the trigger pull 
on the cal. .45 automatic pistol M1911 and M1911A1, and nonrequisition- 
able tools for repair of parts. The weights alone are applicable to organ- 
izational, field, and base maintenance ; the balance of these tools are in- 
tended for base maintenance use only. 



Weights, trigger pull 
Tool, staking, plunger tube 

Fixture, riveting, front sight 

Tool, swaging, slide stop notch 



Tool, staking, bushing 



Used to check the trigger pull. 

Used for staking the slide stop and 
safety plunger tube in the receiver. 

Used to rivet the front sight in place 
on the slide. 

Used to decrease the size of an over- 
size or excessively worn slide stop 
notch in the receiver. 

Used foT staking the stock screw 
bushings in the receiver. 






GAGE, PLUG. NOT GC 

41-G-254-393 



GAGE, PLUG, NOT-GO 
41-G-254-391 



704 



GAGE, SNAP, ADJUSTABLE 
NOT-GO .694 
41 G-336-400 





GAGE, SNAP. NOT-GO .197 GAGE, SNAP NOT-GO 
41-G-339 160 150 41-G-339-150 



Figure !*,!>. Gauges for parts inspectioA. 



87 



09 
03 





| — 3.DIA. — I \. 

STAMP 5^2 LB^ 



SNAG ROD 

HERE 
BEFORE fOUR- 
iw ING LEAD 





TWO- MILD STL. ROD 
V/\ DIA. X 1 1. Lfi. 

\7l\ ONE- LEAD (CA5T 
^— AROUND DETAl L I ) 

^3) ONE- LEAD (CAST 
^— ^ AROUND DETAIL \) 



NOTE: WEIGH AFTER A5SEM 
BLY AND REDUCE WEIGHT BY 

FILING POINT *A* 



5TAMP <bYi LB 



Figure 150 Trigger puff weights. 



OS 



^REAMPF FOfl DCT5. 2 4 7-» <t_0Fl7OD«A. 




.375+.0O5 



.SOI 



i-ZONC-? TA*>(z HOLLS)^ 

J 1 ONE-WDlOfcO 5TL 






.500 




APPAOX. 



f I 'ft 

&R£AMPf] ., II 

^< 7 P F FOB L— ) 5 

Q ) ON&-WDI09Q STL. 
-* ' FIN/MT > ROCK C- 50-5* 



@Ht- IN Dtl. D 
TWO- DP, ROD 
HDN. ROCK'C 56- 



jj. DRILL Z HOLE5 

£4 




rr^ pf in 

DEI 1 



&o 






3-F IN P»CCE|(pB5«4-5X 



7 ) 0NE--WD1Q20 5TL 

2 



ON £-001 LL POD 

US£ ^ B A.- LAP TO :*21 

64 



SEE «3£M. 




TWO-HEX.OP 5CR. 
1/4--ZONCX 3/4 



6 ) ONE-WD K 130STL , 

RN / KT BOCK 55"fcG 




TWO- PR. ROD 

HON $ GC 



Figure f St. Tool for staking slide stop and plunger tube in receiver. 







CHAMF 50* 



fj 5) ONE- WD IQZQ5TL . | 



STANDARD PARTS 



SQC.HD.5CR. Vl6-l6NCx| 



SPRING TO 5U. 



CAP3CR I/4-20NC>; </? 



WASHER. PLAIN I/4 



ONE NUT. HEX 3/£~i6NC-2 



1 3 ONE WASHER , PLAI N 3/& 



fi>«rf ; r, J. Fixture for riveting front tight. 



t£> 




PF IN 

DET. 1 




MO J 0NE-WDI06S 3- 



TAP 5 -16 NC-i (4 HOLES) 
LOC.FROMDtT5.5MS 



TAP |-16NC~5 



-DRILL 4CS1NK FDR 

DET. 6 (1 HOLES) 

TAP j^-ZONC-Z 



FIN/ HDNROCKf^fo 



Jdia.c'bore 

O (2H0LE5) 
( — t-*DIA. 





5 REAM S. F. 
° FOR DET. 1 1 



r'7-i 




f I J 0NE-WDI020 STL . 





-075 

-,ooz 



1 r: 



4 ) ONE(OFEACHOWD1Q- 

FIN/ HDNROCKt*56 

5EE DETAIL A$& BELOW 



.££ 



© ONE-WDI065 5TL 
FIN/ HON ROCK X' 56 



REAM 5.F. FOR DET 1 1 \_/ 



2-I6NG2 5-I6NC-S" 

(1 6 ) ONE- W 01045 STL 





Dp^t .057 



7777 




-.003 





-OOZ 

77777^ 



SHEET Z OF 2 



APPLY TO 

DET. 3 

(FOR SIGHT A 15 07-7) 



.026 -OO 3 

APPLY TO 

DET. 4 
(FOR SIGHT 23 $ 




Figure 152 -Continued. 



CO 




LI5T OF STANDARD PA&TS 



50C HD 3CR ^-IfeNCK 



THftEE DOWEL ^feblA * I !^i 



SPRING ID SUIT 



BALL BEARING- Ud DfA 



14 Six 



50C.HP.5CE J4-20NCX !^"~ 



Figure 153. Tool for swaging slide stop notch. 



to 
w 



^ REAM fc F FOR 0£T. 4 (3 HOLES) 
LOC FROM OETy 2 fc IO 




6 



BtAMPF FOR 
OCT. 11 



^ 



4-I6NC-2. (tholes) 

LOC FROM DET5.Z4K3 





■tH 



i-?ONC-2 (2 HOLES) 
^"UX F&OM D£T5. d 4 14 



TO 



u - 



J 







I 



l> ) QNE-CA5T I EON 

i 




IILL 



holes) 



A REAM P F F6R 

ID f-^-T- Jl • $ U: 



KT 4 (£ M0LE5) 



i-ZDNC-2 (AHOLE*) 1 
*LOC FROM DEI 7 " 




&w-^T73~li r: 



DRILL 4C60RE 

FORDET 14- 



MILL iC'CORE 
FOP DET 14 





D1A PF IN 

DtT. 1- 

| | ) O NE-TOOL 5TL . 





'2- 6 
ONE -CAST IRON 



fc^ttEAMtM. 



P**! 



SEE 

A*«W 



13 J ONE -TOOL 5TL 



yiu T Z OF 2 



(2) J ONE TOOL5TL 



Figure J53 t -Continued. 




5» 



3 

*0 



•5 










-^i 



Figure to-*. Checking inside diameter of barrel bushing^ 





t* 






Figure ?.>;, Checking barrel bushing seat. 



94 



95 




Figure t** -Checking slide stop pin. 




Figure J * f 9 Riveting front sight on slide. 







Figure US. Checking outside diameter of barrel bushing* 



, 



96 






Figure IHO Slaking stock screw bushings. 

97 









PLUNGER TUB£ WITH 
DRFU ROD INSERTbD 



RA PD 91794 
Figure Ml. Slaking Aide stop plunger tube. 




Figure iff? Swaging slide stop notch. 



98 



^U 



kdrf-